VOLUME 10
ISSUE
1
AUGUST , 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
Leap To Judgement

 NCAA CHAMPS
Lady Sun Devil Throwers Carry ASU

 USATF CHAMPS
Setting The Standard

GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS
Kreiner and Greer up their AR’s

THE PLAN
Michael Robertson wins the big one

MOMENTUM DEVELOPMENT
Generating force in the discus

CNS INTENSIVE TRAINING
Re-evaluating training for mature athletes

TEXAS THROWING
Cat Spring Grunt IX

RIDING THE TRADE WINDS
Maui Big Wind Discus Challenge

UPPER BODY PLYOS
Plyos...not just for your legs~

SHOT PUTTER POWER
Training for force for the shot

PARRY O'BRIEN
A legend passes

GIANT LOSS
A friend remembers

OPENING DOORS
Washington preps going places

A SHOT PuTTER'S GUIDE TO POWER

By Pat Corbett

Shot putting has been said to be the most difficult of the throws in so far as the thrower’s ability to make huge distance gains. This is in part because of the weight of the shot and the number of reps that can really be attempted at a high intensity during any training session. Compared to the other throws (with maybe the exception of the hammer), it is difficult to put the shot 30 or more times at a high level of intensity. After a certain point no matter how skilled, fit or strong, the shot putter’s technique will breakdown simply because of the weight of the shot.

This makes the weightroom an important player in the shot putter’s development, particularly the type of lifts she/he chooses. The following information will shed some light on specific lifts and exercises that will target areas that need special attention for the shot putter.

The push press is probably the most important lift a shot putter can do. It comprises the same muscle groups required to put the shot and also incorporates the hips and lower body. It is also a great way to improve power production in the upper and lower body.  The most important aspect of the relationship between the push press and the shot put is the speed on the bar compared to that of an actual throw. Besides other Olympic movements such as the jerks, the push press is the only other lift that is ground-based and requires speed of movement similar to that of a throw.

A push press is performed by placing the bar on top of the deltoids with the elbows forward and up, legs and back straight, head straight and still. The bar is then pushed up by dipping the hips down, while keeping the all body parts tight and straight, then driving the bar up, slightly back (this will happen automatically if all body parts stay straight) and off of the heels, then dipping under the bar (the double knee bend action) as the bar is going up and then standing under the bar (the bar should end up slightly behind the head and over the hips). All of this should occur in a split second with as much speed as possible. As speed increases so does power production and thus more force production for the muscle groups involved in a shot put. When technique is mastered and speed increased, only then should more weight be lifted. But remember; never sacrifice technique for speed or weight.

A study was done at Boise State University to show how the push press can improve the distance on a throw. The participants were college throwers who performed 3 sets of 3 repetitions at 80% of their 1 repetition max. Each thrower did a normal thrower’s warm up and then warmed up to 80% of their push press max and then proceeded to do 3 sets of 3 repetitions at that 80%. They then went back to their normal throwing routine and actually generated more force output compared to just warming up alone. A positive effect on distance thrown was also shown for all participants.

While the push press can be an integral part of a shot putter’s training, there are other lifts that should be a part of regular training.

These are some of the lifts, muscle groups trained and the motions involved in a shot put. While the shot putt for the most part is performed with a pushing motion, the pull motion (or antagonistic) muscle groups are also important to the throw.

Pushing motion exercises:

Dumb Bell and Bar Bell Bench Press and Incline Press - Front Deltoid, Triceps, Pectorals – Pushing motion

Dumb Bell and Bar Bell Presses (standing or seated) – Front and side Deltoids, Triceps, Upper Pectorals – Pushing motion

All Tricep exercises – Pushing motion

All muscle groups have an opposite, or opposing muscle group that allows them to either contract or extend. These muscle groups must be kept in balance with their opposing muscle group to help facilitate optimum performance and help prevent injury.

Pulling motion exercises:

All Pull Ups, Pull Downs and Rowing exercises – latisimus dorsi (back), biceps - opposite or antagonist to the pectorals and biceps

Snatch and Clean Pulls and Shrugs (bar bell or dumb bell) – trapezius opposite or antagonistic to the deltoids

Bicep and tricep work, while not as important to a throw as the larger muscle groups, do play a significant role in the stabilization of the shot through the entire throw and tricep strength will play a significant role in the improvement of the other lifts.

Note: While power and strength can be improved through weightlifting, no amount of weight or weightlifting will help the big iron ball go any farther without good technique.

Just like weightlifting, don’t sacrifice technique for speed or a heavier shot. A lighter or heavier shot may work in some instances but many times the rhythm of the throw is lost with these implements. Make sure that the integrity of the throw is maintained when using a lighter or heavier Shot.  *LSTJ*